Project News

E.g., Oct 2020

ASU’s Neal A. Lester to receive two MLK awards for impactful humanities efforts

Source: ASU Now Date: Thursday, January 17, 2019

Arizona State University Professor Neal A. Lester agrees with poet Maya Angelou’s words: “We are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike.” But that doesn't mean that he sees no value in our differences. So he challenges people to recognize, celebrate and embrace those differences.

'Mustard Man' at Woolworth's 1963 sit-in celebrated by maroon and gold

Source: ASU Now Date: Wednesday, January 16, 2019

“Mr. Salter’s story is a reminder that unsung heroes for justice are always among us. To put a face and story with the iconic Woolworth’s sit-in photograph, especially someone with an Arizona connection, is refreshing,” said Lester, professor of English and director of Project Humanities.

AZOIC, Arizona MLK Celebration Announce 2019 Honorees, New Award

Source: Arizona Informant Date: Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Ahwatukee prof grateful to Ahwatukee for stepping up

Source: Ahwatukee Foothills News Date: Saturday, December 8, 2018

It is so easy to point out challenges and problems and even point fingers of blame at others as we look around and pay close attention to what’s happening in our world – the disappointments, the disagreements, the fights, the incivility and the intolerance.

Dispelling the myths of drag performance

Source: ASU Now Date: Thursday, November 15, 2018

Forget everything you thought you knew about drag. “It’s not (about) gender. Drag is everything; whatever you can imagine,” said local Valley drag performer Miss X on Thursday night at an event hosted by ASU’s Project Humanities, an initiative created to bring people together to listen, talk and connect.

The Bell that Tolls: A Conversation on Death and Dying

Removing the shroud from the concept of death

Source: ASU Now Date: Thursday, October 18, 2018

“And so it stays just on the edge of vision,/ A small unfocused blur, a standing chill/ That slows each impulse down to indecision./ Most things may never happen: this one will.” So wrote British poet Philip Larkin in his 1980 poem “Aubade.” Though the title evokes the welcoming of a new dawn, the subject of the poem — this thing that is certain to happen to all — is death.

Hacks for Humanity grows, inspires others in academia

Source: ASUNow Date: Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Discarded pizza boxes. Empty energy-drink cans. Dozens dancing. And hundreds of people cracking, hacking and tapping away on laptops during a 36-hour marathon binge.

ASU's Hacks For Humanity Spawns New Innovations For Social Good

Source: 91.55 KJZZ Date: Monday, October 8, 2018

When you think about hackers, you might think of headlines about Russian hacking into the 2016 election or Facebook’s latest revelations about millions of its users’ information being hacked.

Hacks for Humanity grows, inspires others in academia

Source: ASU Now Date: Monday, October 8, 2018

Discarded pizza boxes. Empty energy-drink cans. Dozens dancing. And hundreds of people cracking, hacking and tapping away on laptops during a 36-hour marathon binge. Sounds like the internet being broken, but it was a good thing. A very good thing.

Ahwatukee prof’s ‘hackathon’ an exercise for humanity

Source: Ahwatukee Foothills News Date: Friday, September 28, 2018

Mention the word “hackathon,” and the people who don’t look puzzled probably think of a group of geeks locked in a room, huddling over computers and working on codes.

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