Project News

E.g., Feb 2019

Hacking technology for the social good

Source: ASUNow Date: Monday, October 5, 2015

It’s only a few hours into the second annual Hacks 4 Humanity hackathon on Saturday, Oct. 3, and already cases of energy drinks are being wheeled into Stauffer Hall on Arizona State University’s Tempe campus.

Winners of Project Humanities’ Hackathon 2014 Create Life-Saving Application

Source: s [r] Blog Date: Saturday, October 3, 2015

The winners of Hacks for Humanity 2014, a hackathon that combines technological development with humanities studies, have created a life-saving application called ARKHumanity that detects suicidal messages on Twitter and connects at-risk users with a suicide hotline.

Free 36-hour community hackathon for the social good!

Source: Devpost Date: Thursday, October 1, 2015

Imagine - two days of techies, programmers, developers, humanities, artist, students, educators, and creative visionaries gathered in one place to hack for social good and build technology solutions to address pressing issues facing humanity. The mission of Hacks for Humanity 2015 is to create technology solutions and initiatives that will contribute to the social good and address the needs of humanity using the 7 principles of the Humanity 101 movement

An app to help save lives

Source: Fox 10 News Date: Monday, September 21, 2015

A group of people are developing an app that could prevent suicides by reaching out to those in need.

Hack For Humanity: Hacking for the Social Good

Source: AZ Culture Date: Friday, September 18, 2015

Arizona State University’s Project Humanities will host its second Hacks for Humanity event Oct. 3-4, which challenges teams in a 36-hour hackathon for the social good. This ASU and community event combines technology, innovation and the seven principles of “Humanity 101” — kindness, empathy, compassion, respect, forgiveness, integrity and self-reflection.

ARKHumanity app saves lives one tweet at a time

Source: The State Press Date: Monday, September 7, 2015

A group of five students, joined together by Hacks 4 Humanity, is developing an app to save lives using the power of the Internet. ARKHumanity is a mechanism that searches for specific tweets using crisis keywords and getting the person resources and help.

Changemaker Challenge winners reach out to those expressing thoughts of suicide on social media

Source: ASUNow Date: Monday, April 27, 2015

ARKHumanity – which came about at a hackathon co-sponsored by ASU – was inspired by this question and developed technology that scans Twitter for messages that suggest a risk of self-harm and connects the author with immediate support. The project has won the Arizona State University Changemaker Challenge’s top prize of $10,000 seed money.

Upcoming 'Hackathon' uncovers positive side of hacking

Source: azfamily Date: Wednesday, March 11, 2015

PHOENIX -- When you hear the term "hacking," it's usually associated with something negative. But Data Doctors expert Ken Colburn joined us on Good Morning Arizona to tell us about an event that puts a positive spin on the word hacking.

Grad student's research helps save lives through social media

Source: ASUNow Date: Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Jordan Bates, doctoral student in applied mathematics and research associate at the Center for Policy Informatics at Arizona State University, was part of the winning team at September’s Hacks 4 Humanity event, co-hosted by ASU's Project Humanities and EqualityTV.

ASU’S Project Humanities hosts 'Hacks 4 Humanity' this weekend

Source: Ahwatukee Foothills News Date: Friday, September 19, 2014

Arizona State University’s award-winning Project Humanities has partnered with Equality TV to create and host “Hacks 4 Humanity”, a two-day, 36-hour event. This event will combine technological developments with the humanities. Participants will cluster to create their own apps or other technologies that support the social good. Each app will in some way reflect one or more of the seven principles – forgiveness, kindness, integrity, self-reflection, compassion, respect and empathy.

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