Indie Lens Pop-Up

 

 

 

Indie Lens Pop-Up is a neighborhood series that brings people together for film screenings and community-driven conversations. Featuring documentaries seen on PBS's Independent Lens, Indie Lens Pop-Up draws local residents, leaders and organizations to discuss what matters most, from newsworthy topics, to family and relationships. Make friends, share stories, and join the conversation.

  • Real Boy – Changing Hands Bookstore (May 23, 2017)
    • Real Boy is an intimate story of a family in transition. As 19-year-old Bennett Wallace navigates early sobriety, late adolescence, and the evolution of his gender identity, his mother makes her own transformation from resistance to acceptance of her trans son. Along the way, both mother and son find support in their communities, reminding us that families are not only given, but chosen.
  • National Bird –  Burton Barr Library (April 18, 2017)
    • National Bird follows the dramatic journey of three whistleblowers determined to break the silence around one of the most controversial issues of our time: the secret U.S. drone war, which has been waged globally for more than a decade. The film, executive produced by Errol Morris and Wim Wenders, gives rare insight into the program through the eyes of veterans and survivors, to explore the complexities of drone warfare from a human perspective.
  • The Bad Kids – Burton Barr Library (March 14, 2017)
    • Located in an impoverished Mojave Desert community, Black Rock Continuation High School is an alternative for at-risk students with little hope of graduating from a traditional high school. It's their last chance. This coming of age story shows extraordinary educators and talented students combating the crippling effects of poverty.
  • Meet the Patels –  Burton Barr Central Library (November 28, 2016)
    • Ravi Patel is almost 30 and still single, and his tradition-minded Hindu family is not happy. Meet the Patels explores the influences of culture and identity on the most intense, personal, and important part of one's life — love.
  • Peace Officer –  Burton Barr Library (April 12 2016)
    • William “Dub” Lawrence was a former sheriff who established and trained one of Utah's first SWAT teams, only to watch in horror as that same unit killed his son-in-law in a controversial standoff years later. In Peace Officer, Dub, driven by an obsessive sense of mission, uses his investigative skills to uncover the truth about that incident and other officer-involved shootings in his community, while tackling larger questions about the changing face of police investigations nationwide.
  • The Black Panthers –  Burton Barr Library (February 16, 2016)
    • In the turbulent 1960s, change was coming to America and the fault lines could no longer be ignored — cities were burning, Vietnam was exploding, and disputes raged over equality and civil rights. A new revolutionary culture was emerging and it sought to drastically transform the system. The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense would, for a short time, put itself at the vanguard of that change.  
  • In Football We Trust–  ASU Memorial Union Pima Auditorium (January 26, 2016)
    • In Football We Trust transports viewers deep inside the tightly knit and complex Polynesian community in Salt Lake City, one of the chief sources of the modern influx of Pacific Islander football players to the NFL. Shot over a four-year period with intimate access, the film follows four young men striving to overcome gang violence and near poverty through the promise of American football.
  • Autism in Love  –  First Congregational United Church of Christ ( January 7, 2016) 
    • Finding love can be hard enough for anyone, but for those with an autism spectrum disorder, the challenges may seem overwhelming. The disorder can jeopardize the core characteristics of a successful relationship — communication and social interaction. Filmed in a highly personal style, Matt Fuller’s Autism in Love offers a warm and stereotype-shattering look at four people as they pursue and manage romantic relationships.