Dispelling the Myths

  • Dispelling the Myths: "Critical Race Theory" in K-12 Classrooms –virtual (August 24, 2021)
    • Why are conversations about race, equity, racial justice and "Critical Race Theory" in k-12 classrooms so contentious now? Three experienced and acclaimed 2019 Teachers of the Year-AZ, UT, and AR-- share their experiences and perspectives on the social and political debate taking the US by storm. In the wake of the US and global racial justice “reckoning,” where does this focus on Critical Race Theory fall and how does this “controversy” challenge the foundation of US education and race relations?
  • Transgender Athletes and Sport – Virtual (August 12, 2021)
    • This presentation addresses myths, misconceptions, and outright lies about trans and intersex women athletes in women's sport. Does fairness in competition mean including all women and putting a stop to policing femininity? According to the International Olympic Committee, "participation in sport is a human right."This presentation will explore connections between testosterone and sport performance and address the current anti-transgender political and social climate. Keynote by Dr. Veronica Ivy and facilitated by Dr. Scott Brooks.
  • “Heretics,” Pagans, Atheists, and Polytheists – Humanist Society of Greater Phoenix (September 18, 2019)
    • Too often, Americans' acceptance of world religions is largely contingent upon a theological proximity to Christianity. Hence, Atheists, Pagans, and Polytheists face a slew of stereotypes and discrimination for their beliefs. This program is an opportunity to dispel common myths about these worldviews while highlighting their humanistic emphasis on these seven principles of Humanity 101- empathy, compassion, kindness, forgiveness, integrity, respect, and self-reflection.
  • The Angry “Other” Sema Foundation (February 28, 2019)
    • When society is filled with worn out tropes like “the angry black man/woman,” “the spicy Latina” and the “over-emotional woman,” whoever really gets to be angry? Join us in a conversation that explores the way anger is used as a framing device to instill fear and “Other” marginalized communities.
  • Drag Kings and Drag Queens Filmbar (November 15, 2018)
    • How does drag culture challenge gender identity? What is the history of drag, and how is drag performance shaping mainstream culture today? Facilitator “Local Hip Historian” Marshall Shore explores these questions through drag performances and community conversation on identity, gender constructions, sexuality, and stereotypes. Local guest performers include Miss X, Mia Inez Adams, Astrud Aurelia, Dagoberto Bailon, Eddie Broadway, and Jericho Galindo.
  • Living with Trauma and PTSD UMOM (October 25, 2018)
    • An estimated 70% of US adults have experienced trauma at least once in their lives, and up to 20% of these people go on to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Traumatic experiences can have lasting negative effects on both physical and mental health, especially with traumatic events that occur during childhood. While awareness of PTSD and trauma is steadily increasing, misconceptions remain. Join this conversation about different facets and manifestations of post-traumatic stress disorder and trauma, while exploring avenues for healing individually and communally
  • Religious Doctrines and Religious Dogma ASU Tempe Campus (February 8, 2018)
    • A community conversation with individuals of Sikh, Mormon, Islamic and Secular identities to dispel common myths about their world religions and worldviews.
  • Homelessness First Congregational United Church of Christ (March 23, 2017)
    • A conversation on the realities of homelessness and instability in our society. It can happen to anyone, at any time, for any reason. In today’s recovering economy more people find themselves experiencing homelessness.
  • Reentry –  I’ve done my time, now what? - West Hall Room 135 (February 23, 2017)
    • A conversation on the realities of reentry into society after incarceration. After these Americans have served their time, they face enormous barriers to rejoin society. For many people, the return to society is only the beginning of a life-long sentence. How do we reinvent reentry for formerly incarcerated people for our communities and our country
  • Recovery Narratives –  West Hall 135 (September 27, 2016)
    • Discussion on recovery narratives and narratives of addiction. Join us as we explore transformative powers of healing through storytelling. Facilitated by Elizbeth Athens with respondents Karla Cesal, Robert Braxton, and Patricia Brooks
  • Youth and Mental Health –  Memorial Union Pima Auditorium (April 7, 2016)
    • Join us for this panel discussion featuring mental health professionals and young individuals who will share stories of stigma, struggle, and success while living with mental illness. 
  • Beyond The Hijab: Pakistani Women’s Perspectives –  West Hall (March 26, 2015)
    • A conversation with the visiting Pakistani faculty from the Kinnaird College for Women in Lahore, Pakistan. In partnership with the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict
  • Dispelling the Myths of the Beauty and Beauty Queens – Memorial Union Pima Auditorium (March 2, 2015) 
    • A conversation on the realities behind the image of a beauty queen. The panel includes Patti Council, State Director/Producer at Miss Arizona United States Organization and the Miss Arizona World Pageant and the reigning Miss Arizona, Mrs. Arizona and Miss Arizona World. Moderated by Dr. Joanne Rondilla, faculty member in the School of Social Transformation.